THE CHEW CONFERENCE 2017 SCHEDULE

THE CHEW CONFERENCE 2017

Contesting Modernisation:

The Future of Health, Environment, and Welfare in China

 

 

Venue: Lecture Theatre 1 – China Centre

 

10:30 – 10:45      Welcome speech

10:45 –  11:45     Keynote speech

                         Prof. Micah Muscolino

Professor of Chinese History, University of Oxford

 

 11:45 – 12:30     Lunch break

 

Environmental Sustainability and Social Justice

 

12:30               Dr Jennifer Holdaway

Co-Director, Forum on Health, Environment and Development, School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, University of Oxford

Balancing Environmental and Social Justice: Implications of China’s Stronger Environmental Protection Policies for Rural-Urban Inequality.

12:45               Alexandra Foote

MSc graduate in Environment and Development, London School of Economics (LSE)

Community Based Ecotourism in the Tibetan Plateau

13:00               Chang Liu

PhD candidate in Chinese Studies, Jilin University Institute

Picking up the Fashionable Items from Transnational Waste: On Chinese Women’s Striving for Post-Revolutionary Chinese Femininity

13:15-13:30      Question time, chaired by Dr. Anna Lora-Wainwright

 

 

Environment and Modernity in Transitional China

 

13:30               Dr. Jan Erik Christensen, Independent Scholar 

Confucian Philosophy, Education, and Ecological Sustainability.

13:45             Dr. Chaohua Wang, Independent Scholar

Societal Empowerment for a Better Future in China.

14:00             Coroline Goron

PhD Candiate in Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick

‘Ecological Civilization’ and the Continuation of Modernization Politics in China.

 

14:15-14:30    Question time, chaired by Rowan Alcock

 

Coffee and Tea Break (14:30-15:00)

 

Activism and Grassroots Movements

15:00             Dr Nicholas Loubere

Associate Senior Lecturer in the Study of Modern China, Lund University

Microcredit, Modernity and Marginalisation in Rural China.

15:15              Suzanne Barber, PhD candidate in Anthropology, Indiana University, Bloomington

We Must Not Allow the Government to Shirk Responsibilities”: The Chinese Animal Rights Movement as a Question of Chinese Citizenship.

15:30               Li Zipeng, PhD Candidate in Chinese StudieS, University of Edinburgh

Would the ‘Online Public Voice’ be Considered by the Chinese Government During the Environmental Crisis?

15:30-15:45     Question time, chaired by Irina Fedorenko  

Animals and Chinese environments

15:45               Dr. Kin Wing Chan

Postdoctoral Researcher, School of Geography and Planning, University of Cardiff

The Preformative Eco-Friendly Farmers: Governmentality and Regulation of Animal Waste Practices in Hong Kong (1973-1997).

16:00               Alisha Gao, Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science with the Focus on Area Studies China/East Asia, Goethe University

Solving the Negative Externalities of Factory Farming in China.

16:15               Dr Thomas White, Teaching Associate in Anthropology, University of Cambridge

Patriotic camels and the Political Ecology of China’s Borderlands. 

16:30-16:45     Question time, chaired by Dr. Loretta Lou

Coffee and Tea Break (16:45-17:15)

17:15-18:15          Roundtable Discussion

18:15-18:45          Wine reception

19:00                   Conference Dinner at Zheng Restaurant

                   

 

 

 

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THE CHEW LECTURE 2017

PROFESSOR PRASENJIT DUARA

Oscar L. Tang Family Professor of East Asian Studies Duke University

prasenjit

Date: 10 May, 2017 (Wednesday) Time: 1pm-2pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre University of Oxford China Centre Dickson Poon Building Canterbury Road, Oxford OX2 6LU

Re-Sacralizing the Landscape:
Asian Communities and a Sustainable Future

The crisis of global modernity has been produced by human overreach that was founded upon a paradigm of national modernization. Today, three global changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative sources of transcendence – the ideals, principles and ethics once found in religions — define our condition. The physical salvation of the world is becoming the transcendent goal of our times, transcending national sovereignty. The foundations of sovereignty can no longer be sought in tunnelled histories of nations; we are recognizing that histories have always been circulatory and the planet is a collective responsibility.

I re-consider the values and resources in Asian traditions – particularly of China and India – that Max Weber found wanting in their capacity to achieve modernity. Several traditions in Asia, particularly in local communities, offer different ways of understanding the relationship between the self and nature. The idea of transcendence in these communities is more dialogical than radical or dualistic, i.e. where God or the human subject is separated from nature. Transnational civil society, NGOs, quasi-governmental and transnational agencies committed to the inviolability of the ‘commons’ as the fount of life are finding common cause with these precarious communities whose only means of resistance is often the sacred authority embedded in nature. Drawing on ideas of ‘emergence’, I suggest that, in the spaces of contact between the old and the new, there is a hopeful, if flickering, notion of the sacrality of nature.

This event is organised by CHEW (China’s Health, Environment, and Welfare) Research Group and is generously funded by the University of Oxford China Centre and Green Templeton College.

CHEW Conference 2017 – schedule

THE CHEW CONFERENCE 2017

Contesting Modernisation:

The Future of Health, Environment, and Welfare in China

 

Conference Schedule

 

 

Venue: Lecture Theatre 1 – China Centre

 

10:30 – 10:45      Welcome speech

 

10:45 –  11:45     Keynote speech          Prof. Micah Muscolino

Professor of Chinese History, University of Oxford

 

 11:45 – 12:30     Lunch break

 

Environmental Sustainability and Social Justice

 

12:30               Dr Jennifer Holdaway

Co-Director, Forum on Health, Environment and Development, School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, University of Oxford

Balancing Environmental and Social Justice: Implications of China’s Stronger Environmental Protection Policies for Rural-Urban Inequality.

 

12:45               Alexandra Foote

MSc graduate in Environment and Development, London School of Economics (LSE)

Community Based Ecotourism in the Tibetan Plateau

13:00               Chang Liu, PhD candidate in Chinese Studies, Jilin University Institute

Picking up the Fashionable Items from Transnational Waste: On Chinese Women’s Striving for Post-Revolutionary Chinese Femininity

13:15-13:30      Question time, chaired by Dr. Anna Lora-Wainwright

 

Environment and Modernity in Transitional China

 

13:30               Dr. Jan Erik Christensen, Independent Scholar

Confucian Philosophy, Education, and Ecological Sustainability.

13:45             Dr. Chaohua Wang, Independent Scholar

Societal Empowerment for a Better Future in China.

14:00             Coroline Goron, PhD Candiate in Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick

 ‘Ecological Civilization’ and the Continuation of Modernization Politics in China.

14:15-14:30    Question time, chaired by Rowan Alcock

 

    Coffee and Tea Break (14:30-15:00)

Activism and Grassroots Movements

 

15:00             Dr Nicholas Loubere, Associate Senior Lecturer in the Study of Modern China, Lund University

Microcredit, Modernity and Marginalisation in Rural China.

15:15              Suzanne Barber, PhD candidate in Anthropology, Indiana University, Bloomington

We Must Not Allow the Government to Shirk Responsibilities”: The Chinese Animal Rights Movement as a Question of Chinese Citizenship.

15:30               Li Zipeng, PhD Candidate in Chinese Studies, University of Edinburgh

Would the ‘Online Public Voice’ be Considered by the Chinese Government During the Environmental Crisis?

15:30-15:45     Question time, chaired by Irina Fedorenko  

 

Animals and Chinese environments

15:45               Dr. Kin Wing Chan, Postdoctoral Researcher, School of Geography and Planning, University of Cardiff

The Preformative Eco-Friendly Farmers: Governmentality and Regulation of Animal Waste Practices in Hong Kong (1973-1997).

16:00               Alisha Gao

Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science with the Focus on Area Studies China/East Asia, Goethe University

Solving the Negative Externalities of Factory Farming in China.

 

16:15               Dr Thomas White, Teaching Associate in Anthropology, University of Cambridge

Patriotic camels and the Political Ecology of China’s Borderlands. 

16:30-16:45     Question time, chaired by Dr. Loretta Lou

 

Coffee and Tea Break (16:45-17:15)

17:15-18:15          Roundtable Discussion

18:15-18:45          Wine reception

19:00                   Conference Dinner at Zheng Restaurant

                   

 

 

 

Peter Ho – China’s Embedded Activism: Conflict, Civic action and Environment in a Semi-Authoritarian Context

Green Templeton College, Barclays Room

Saturday, October 31, 12.00- 13.00

Ho

“Social activism in China is not an activity with a fair degree of autonomy, but occupies a social space enmeshed in a web of interpersonal relations, informal rules, and shared ideas. Yet, different from a repressed activism these embedding conditions both limit it, while simultaneously making it possible. (…) As a result, there is less risk of social instability and repression at the hand of the governing elite” (Peter Ho in China’s embedded activism)

 

Abstract

The emergence of social movements is generally seen as an indicator of democratization. The presentation argues that such a view overlooks the nature of political change in China, which entails a more gradual transition. In this light, several questions will be highlighted. What does the limited political space imply for the development of a social movement in China? Is the possibility for a social movement a precondition for the development of civil society? What are the prospects for the emergence of a social movement in China, and how would it relate to international forces? These questions are explored by focusing on one of the most active areas of civil society in contemporary China: the environmental realm. It is maintained that China’s semi-authoritarian political setup in association with increased social spaces for civic action has created a milieu for embeddedness in social movement. Contrary to totalitarian control, the semiauthoritarian environment is restrictive, but paradoxically, also conducive to nationwide, voluntary collective action.

 

Biographical sketch

 

Peter Ho is Chair Professor of Chinese Economy and Development and Director of the European Research Council (ERC) Project on Land Policy and Administration in China. Peter Ho has published over 10 books amongst which with Oxford University Press, Routledge, and Blackwell Publishers. Ho has been published extensively in leading SSCI and SCI-rated journals of Development, Planning, and Environment with impact factors from 5.805 to 9.599. His works have been cited in a total of 2,056 instances (1,304 over the past five years) and have an H-index of 25 articles with a minimum of 25 citations each. In recognition of his scientific achievements, Prof. Ho was awarded the prestigious Research Grant as Consolidator by the European Research Council (ERC). This highly competitive prize of 1.5 million Euros targets the top scientists within the European Union. The ERC Review Panel noted about Prof. Ho that he: “is a world renowned scholar with an impressive set of publications and awards to his name” while his achievements and publications “show great intellectual capacity and creativity” (ERC Review Report). Peter Ho has initiated and supervised large-scale projects with a total budget of over 5.7 million Euro. Peter Ho acts as advisor to members of the Chinese government and the Dutch Cabinet, including the Prime Minister and the Minister of Foreign Affairs. He has served on various commissions as a scientific advisor for the OECD, the EU, international corporations and banks. Prof. Ho also provides interviews for the media which have included USA Today, BBC, Belgian and Dutch 8 o’ Clock News, American PBS, and the China Daily.

 

Reactions to China’s Embedded Activism

Personally commended by Rem Koolhaas (Architect CCTV Building, Beijing and rated World’s 100 Most Influential Persons by Time Magazine), 2008

“China’s Embedded Activism is another important effort in making sense of the changes that are taking place in China… highly commendable [and] a helpful theoretical lens.” Wang Zhengxu, The China Quarterly, 2008

“A most important observation by Peter Ho is that the developmental pattern of environmental NGOs in China can be characterized as “embedded activism” – Zhan Xueyong, HK Research Council, 2011

Video, reviews and Chinese translation http://baike.baidu.com/link?url=roEFNnJbsm8XapZc8EkKhSlJA5GIUvVohczwgQSR9JhEaAWVxPfSUgkWIwzmuWUyCFwFrnYSPEmjqpCF1cqdq

Paul Jobin – The people vs Taiwan’s Radio Corporation of America: A Groundbreaking Toxic Tort Class Action

Paul Jobin
University of Paris Diderot

 

 
26 October 2015
14:00-15:00
China Centre, Canterbury road,
Seminar room 1, level 1

 

In April 2015, after seven years of court hearings and a mobilization that started in 1998, the district court of Taipei made a historic decision for legal class action in Taiwan, that bears important meanings for other industrial countries, in particular for countries with an important electronic industry like China or Korea, as well as for the resolution of other industrial diseases conflicts. The court ordered the defendant RCA – Radio Corporation of America – and its parent firm Technicolor (alias Thompson Electronics) to pay compensation in the sum of NT$ 560M to 445 plaintiffs, former workers at the RCA plant in Taoyuan, after determining that the company had exposed the employees to toxic substances by illegally disposing of its used chemicals. Some plaintiffs were excluded from that decision because of prescription—a major obstacle considering the long latency between exposure to the toxicants and the occurrence of health problems. Also the amount of compensation decided by the judges is low compared to toxic torts in the U.S. or Japan. In addition another parent company, the American firm General Electric, has not been condemned. So the trial will now continue at the court of appeal with an additional group of plaintiffs (making that a group of near 1500 plaintiffs). Beyond money, the main issue that matters for the leaders of that mobilization is a question of social justice: individuals and families whose lives have been torn by corporate negligence and cynicism wish that the full extent of the damage be recognized.

In contrast with toxic torts focusing on one toxicant (asbestos or nuclear radiation for instance), this trial has dealt with a “cocktail” of toxicants (among which organic solvents like trichloroethylene played a preeminent role) and numerous consequences on the health of the workers: several types of cancers, miscarriages, irregular menstruations, etc. As a consequence, with the help of many experts and scholars, the plaintiffs and their lawyers have made tremendous efforts to gather sufficient proof so as to establish the causality between the pathologies and the exposure to the toxicants. This civil action in Taiwan might therefore create a precedent for the current regulation of occupational and environmental health. It may also question the consequences of the long haul effects of some foreign investments. By virtue of the
number of plaintiffs, the nature of the defense (a combination of foreign companies) and the extreme complexity of the toxicological and epidemiological causality, the litigation – what is
called “toxic tort” in the U.S. – is an outstanding case study for public health sciences, law and social sciences. In Taiwan where RCA has paved the way for the success story of the electronics
industry, it has also become a symbolic issue that questions the priorities of economic development vs. public health prevention. After RCA factories were closed in Taiwan in 1992,
the production was transferred to China where similar problems can be expected.

………………………………………
Paul Jobin is currently Associate professor in the Department of East Asian Studies of Paris Diderot University. From 2007 to 2013, he conducted research at the French Centre for Research
on Contemporary China – Taiwan branch, first as guest researcher and later as director. From January 2016, he will be based again in Taiwan, at the Institute of Sociology of Academia Sinica. Since his PhD dissertation, his research has focused on industrial diseases in Japan and Taiwan.

His talk at CHEW will follow on a recent book chapter with Yu-Hwei Tseng: “Guinea Pigs Go to Court: Epidemiology and Class Actions in Taiwan,” in Powerless Science? The Making of the
Toxic World in the Twentieth Century (Berghahn Books 2014).
For his complete CV and more publications: https://univ-paris-diderot.academia.edu/PaulJobin

View in pdf.: Paul-Jobin Oxford

Dr. Jenny Chan

Jenny Chan (PhD in Sociology, 2014) joined the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies at the University of Oxford in September 2014. Educated at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (BSSc in Sociology) and the University of Hong Kong (MPhil in Sociology), she was a Reid Research Scholar while pursuing a PhD at the University of London. In 2013-2014 she received the prestigious Great Britain-China Educational Award. Currently she serves as Board Member of the International Sociological Association’s Research Committee on Labor Movements (2014-2018) and Editor of the Global Labour Journal(2015-present).

Jenny Chan is writing her first book provisionally entitled Dying for an iPhone: Apple, Foxconn, and a New Generation of Chinese Workers (co-authored with Pun Ngai and Mark Selden), which is available in English, Chinese, Spanish, and Italian. Her recent articles have appeared in Current Sociology, Modern China, Critical Asian Studies, Human Relations, Global Labour Journal, The Asia-Pacific Journal, The South Atlantic Quarterly, New Labor Forum, Labor Notes, New Internationalist, New Technology, Work and Employment, and SACOM (Students and Scholars Against Corporate Misbehavior).

Jenny is working on a joint research project about the emergence of student labor in state capitalist China. Vocational school students do “internships” irrelevant to their educational goals and fields of study, subject to extension as production requires at short-staffed factories. Far from being freely chosen, the Chinese internship program is collectively organized on a mass scale, with industrial enterprises, local governments, and schools subverting the rights of student workers for the accumulation of profit.

Xuejie Ding

IMG_0837

Xuejie Ding is a Probationary Research Student in the Sociology department at the University of Oxford. She received a BS in sociology from the University of Macao and an MPhil in Sociology from the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on the correlated of socioeconomic status and health in ageing societies. Other topics that interest her include social and behavioural genetics, inequality, family sociology.

Talk title: Income inequality, wellbeing and health among Chinese older adults

Angela Leggett

March 11, 2010. QUT ci 2011 Prospectus Angela Leggett. phototonyphillips.com

Angela Leggett is a Ph.D. candidate at the Graduate School of East Asian Studies (GEAS), Freie Universität, Berlin. Her current research examines the influence of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) on environmental Corporate Social Responsibility of enterprises in China. After completing a Bachelor of Business, a Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Honours in Australia, Angela undertook a Masters in Contemporary East Asian Studies at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Her M.A. dissertation investigated CSO influence on Chinese consumers behaviour for green and safe food. Previously she has worked in academic and industry contexts in Australia, Germany, South Korea and China. Most recently, Angela worked in a consulting capacity for both enterprises and CSOs in China, providing the impetus for her Ph.D. project.

Contact email address: aleggett@zedat.fu-berlin.de

Talk Title:

“Brining Green Food to the Table: the influence of environmental civil society organisations on consumer behaviour for green food products in China”

 

 

Dr. Daniele Brombal

Daniele

Daniele Brombal is Assistant Professor at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. His research focuses on China’s State-society relations and decision-making processes in the fields of environmental protection and public health, and on the study of institutional determinants of policy-oriented research. Before entering the academic career, Daniele worked as  Research Consultant and Health Programme Officer at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Italy (Embassy of Italy in China). In 2009, he was UN/DESA Fellow. Between 2012 and 2014, he took part in the EU FP-7 Marie Curie IRSES projects ‘Global Partners in Contaminated Land Management’ (GLOCOM) and ‘Evaluating Policies for
Sustainable Energy Investments’ (EPSEI), being hosted as IRSES Fellow by the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences (CRAES). He is member of the Board of Directors of the international NGO Asia-Onlus, operating in Tibetan areas of China. Daniele holds a PhD in Languages, Cultures and Societies (University of Venice, 2012).